Contemporary Clinical Dentistry

REVIEW ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 339--345

Prevalence of tooth mortality among adults in India: A systematic review and meta-analysis


Malliga Venkat, Chandrashekar Janakiram, Venkitachalam Ramanarayanan 
 Department of Public Health Dentistry, Amrita School of Dentistry, AIMS, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham University, Kochi, Kerala, India

Correspondence Address:
Chandrashekar Janakiram
Department of Public Health Dentistry, Amrita School of Dentistry, AIMS, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Ponekkara P.O, Kochi - 682 041, Kerala
India

Tooth loss remains a significant deterrent to oral health and adversely affects the dietary intake and nutritional status of individuals compromising their general health. It is a debilitating and irreversible condition and is considered as the “final marker of disease burden for oral health.” The prevalence of tooth mortality and its causes has been studied for many years through point prevalence studies; however, there is a need to generate a national representative data. This study aimed to systematically review the available literature measuring the prevalence of tooth mortality in India. We searched the following databases for studies that had assessed the prevalence of tooth mortality in India: PubMed/Medline, PubMed Central, and Scopus. This yielded 36 studies, of which 16 eligible cross-sectional studies assessing the prevalence among those 18 years and above were included. Meta-analyses using the random-effects model were conducted for tooth mortality outcomes which stratified for different covariates such as age groups, gender, geographic region, population group, type of index, and reason for loss using MetaXL Version 5.3 Software, Netherlands developed by Dr Jan J Barendregt. Pooled prevalence was used to estimate the overall effect, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). A total of 13,662 adults participated in the 16 studies. We found that the overall prevalence of complete tooth mortality (loss of 32 teeth) was 10.7% (95% CI: 10.2%–11.2%, 16 studies, n = 2249) and partial tooth mortality (having one or more teeth) was 58.8% (95% CI: 57.9%–59.6%, 16 studies, n = 7526). Rural area adults showed twice 61% (60.5%, 95% CI: 58.9–62.1, 7 studies) than urban adults. Females had higher partial tooth mortality (48.2%%), whereas males higher complete tooth mortality (20.2%). There was higher methodological heterogeneity of included studies. Nearly 35% of adults have complete or partial tooth mortality. Greater tooth mortality indicates the burden of the prosthetic needs.


How to cite this article:
Venkat M, Janakiram C, Ramanarayanan V. Prevalence of tooth mortality among adults in India: A systematic review and meta-analysis.Contemp Clin Dent 2021;12:339-345


How to cite this URL:
Venkat M, Janakiram C, Ramanarayanan V. Prevalence of tooth mortality among adults in India: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Contemp Clin Dent [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 Jan 19 ];12:339-345
Available from: https://www.contempclindent.org/article.asp?issn=0976-237X;year=2021;volume=12;issue=4;spage=339;epage=345;aulast=Venkat;type=0