Contemporary Clinical Dentistry
   
  Home | About us | Editorial board | Search
Ahead of print | Current Issue | Archives | Advertise
Instructions | Online submission| Contact us | Subscribe |

 

Login  | Users Online: 601  Print this pageEmail this pageSmall font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 383-388

Could different formulations of grape seed (vitis vinifera)influencethephysical properties of conventional glass ionomer cement?


1 Department of Dental Biomaterials, Faculty of Dentistry, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt; Department of Basic Oral and Medical Sciences, College of Dentistry, Qassim University, Buraydah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Dental Biomaterials, Faculty of Dentistry, Mansoura University, Mansoura; Department of Dental Biomaterials, Faculty of Dentistry, Horus University, New Damietta, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Neven S Aref
Department of Dental Biomaterials, Faculty of Dentistry, 35516 El Gomhoria St, Mansoura University, Mansoura

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_696_20

Rights and Permissions

Objective: The aim is to evaluate the ability of different formulations of grape seed (GS) to influence the physical properties of conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC). Materials and Methods: Five groups were considered; Group I: Unmodified GIC (control), II: 3% v/v GS oil-modified GIC, III: 5% v/v GS oil-modified GIC, IV: 3% v/v ethanolic extract of GS (EEGS)-modified GIC and V: 5% v/v EEGS-modified GIC. Assessment parameters were; compressive strength, shear bond strength, surface roughness, water sorption and solubility and color difference. A representative specimen of each group was used for being analyzed by the Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Analysis of variance was used to compare the results, followed by a Tukey post hoc test (P < 0.05). Results: 3% v/v GS oil-modified GIC only exhibited a significant increase in its compressive strength and shear bond strength. Concurrently, there was a significant decrease in surface roughness, water sorption and solubility for 3% v/v GS oil-modified GIC group (P < 0.05). The least color change was for 3% v/v GS oil-modified GIC, which is a clinically acceptable change. Conclusions: 3% v/v GS oil-modified conventional GIC is an optimistic formulation of a restorative material with enhanced physical properties and agreeable esthetic.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed168    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded27    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal